July142014
This week’s episode of Friendship! Effort! Victory! is in re-records and edits, and should be up tomorrow. It’s a bit of a rare treat, coming one week after the last one, and is about Kouhei Horikoshi's notable flop Barrage (or Barrage of the Battle Star if you’re in the east).
It’ll be an interesting one, because it’s a pretty middling comic at best, yet its position as one of the first times Viz Media took a chance on licensing a comic DAY ONE, back when International Weekly Shonen Jump was just Shonen Jump Alpha. I mean sure we were still running two weeks behind back then, but that doesn’t lessen how big a deal Barrage is to western audiences.
…. Even if it sucks.

This week’s episode of Friendship! Effort! Victory! is in re-records and edits, and should be up tomorrow. It’s a bit of a rare treat, coming one week after the last one, and is about Kouhei Horikoshi's notable flop Barrage (or Barrage of the Battle Star if you’re in the east).

It’ll be an interesting one, because it’s a pretty middling comic at best, yet its position as one of the first times Viz Media took a chance on licensing a comic DAY ONE, back when International Weekly Shonen Jump was just Shonen Jump Alpha. I mean sure we were still running two weeks behind back then, but that doesn’t lessen how big a deal Barrage is to western audiences.

…. Even if it sucks.

July82014

oz-xiii said: I just finished listening to your podcast about Shaman King, and I would like to add a tidbit about Chocolove/Joco's name. It's been said that he's named after medication called Chocola BB, but as this is Takei we're talking about, he could have very well intended the racist joke. I've also a question, which isn't Shaman King related, but you mentioned the series Black Cat in your podcast. I couldn't find and past episodes about it and was wondering if you have/will do an episode on that series?

I’d never made the Chocola BB connection myself, but there’s a lot to be said about this, it having the same sort of allusion as in Lyserg Diethel’s name. So it’s totally believable that it’d be intended, which makes the tone-deaf race stuff all the more awkward. Like… He would have had to blunder into that pretty hard. I’ve gotta make sure I look into this before the follow-up stuff I’ve got planned. Thanks for pointing it out!

As for Black Cat, I’ve wanted to do an episode about it for pretty much the entire run of FEV, and have more notes on that than most other comics I want to touch on. With the way I go about getting the episodes done I’d hate to peg when it’ll have an episode, but at the moment I’m only working a month ahead, so it’s altogether possible It’ll come up in August.

July72014
andysislands:

thedespondent:

That’s right! It’s time for a brand-spanking new episode of Friendship! Effort! Victory!. The hiatus is finally over, and I return with an episode about the very first manga I ever laid eyes upon, the supernatural cult hit Shaman King, by Hiroyuki Takei.
I talk about a lot of stuff (but by no means enough stuff), including incidental racism, and mature approaches to sexual encounters in a comic aimed at younger readers. And like… Ghost fights. Because that’s what the comic has a lot of, so I couldn’t really avoid it.
I’m still pretty rusty, but I hope you enjoy the episode and come back next week for ANOTHER new episode of my niche little wonder-project.

Good show! I enjoyed it. I’ll probably go back and listen to some past episodes at some point.
I just have a couple technical notes to add…
- Even though the “Funbari No Uta” numbered chapters were released in the original volume 32, Takei started writing them for Akamaru Jump back around the time of volume 21. This makes it bit less of a “planned sequel” and more a “what if” story that he made up as he went along.
- Speaking of volume 32, Shueisha wasn’t looking for a certain level of fan support to release the volume. What actually happened was the volume was scheduled for release, then it was suddenly pulled off the schedule. It got delayed one or two months. This was most likely so Takei could add in chapter 285 and include the Funbari No Uta chapters. Rarely does volume release dates slip in Japan, but once or twice a year it happens to a series or two. The internet just had some rumors at the time, but I never saw the official Shueisha source stating for direct fan feedback.
- One other interesting tidbit about the Shaman King series not covered (like lots of other things) is the card game in Japan. Rarely does a Card Game become successful, but this was really, really successful. Takei made most of his money from this card game and some big licensing deals with 4Kids, Matel, and Konami. But the card game was so successful that it had 3 videogames, and the card game actually had a reboot of the first set under the title “O.S.” So anytime a card game goes on for many years and you need to reprint and update the original sets of card, that’s a really good sign. It also had tournaments at Jump Festa for at least 2 years. If memory servers me right… there was over 250 participants for the final national tournament at Jump Festa.

Oh goodness, so great to have you in particular listen in, especially on this episode.
The volume 32 and Funbari no Uta stuff is a pretty big slip-up of mine (along with mispronouncing Takei the whole damn pod), working off limited research so long after the fact, so it’s really interesting to hear the reality behind those two things.
The card game though… Like… Wow, how have I never heard of this? I’m gonna have to look into it all and put it in a follow-up bit along with the corrections, because that’s a rare thing to hear about, to be sure.
Thanks for listening and following up with all this stuff, man. Appreciated!

andysislands:

thedespondent:

That’s right! It’s time for a brand-spanking new episode of Friendship! Effort! Victory!. The hiatus is finally over, and I return with an episode about the very first manga I ever laid eyes upon, the supernatural cult hit Shaman King, by Hiroyuki Takei.

I talk about a lot of stuff (but by no means enough stuff), including incidental racism, and mature approaches to sexual encounters in a comic aimed at younger readers. And like… Ghost fights. Because that’s what the comic has a lot of, so I couldn’t really avoid it.

I’m still pretty rusty, but I hope you enjoy the episode and come back next week for ANOTHER new episode of my niche little wonder-project.

Good show! I enjoyed it. I’ll probably go back and listen to some past episodes at some point.

I just have a couple technical notes to add…

- Even though the “Funbari No Uta” numbered chapters were released in the original volume 32, Takei started writing them for Akamaru Jump back around the time of volume 21. This makes it bit less of a “planned sequel” and more a “what if” story that he made up as he went along.

- Speaking of volume 32, Shueisha wasn’t looking for a certain level of fan support to release the volume. What actually happened was the volume was scheduled for release, then it was suddenly pulled off the schedule. It got delayed one or two months. This was most likely so Takei could add in chapter 285 and include the Funbari No Uta chapters. Rarely does volume release dates slip in Japan, but once or twice a year it happens to a series or two. The internet just had some rumors at the time, but I never saw the official Shueisha source stating for direct fan feedback.

- One other interesting tidbit about the Shaman King series not covered (like lots of other things) is the card game in Japan. Rarely does a Card Game become successful, but this was really, really successful. Takei made most of his money from this card game and some big licensing deals with 4Kids, Matel, and Konami. But the card game was so successful that it had 3 videogames, and the card game actually had a reboot of the first set under the title “O.S.” So anytime a card game goes on for many years and you need to reprint and update the original sets of card, that’s a really good sign. It also had tournaments at Jump Festa for at least 2 years. If memory servers me right… there was over 250 participants for the final national tournament at Jump Festa.

Oh goodness, so great to have you in particular listen in, especially on this episode.

The volume 32 and Funbari no Uta stuff is a pretty big slip-up of mine (along with mispronouncing Takei the whole damn pod), working off limited research so long after the fact, so it’s really interesting to hear the reality behind those two things.

The card game though… Like… Wow, how have I never heard of this? I’m gonna have to look into it all and put it in a follow-up bit along with the corrections, because that’s a rare thing to hear about, to be sure.

Thanks for listening and following up with all this stuff, man. Appreciated!

11AM
That’s right! It’s time for a brand-spanking new episode of Friendship! Effort! Victory!. The hiatus is finally over, and I return with an episode about the very first manga I ever laid eyes upon, the supernatural cult hit Shaman King, by Hiroyuki Takei.
I talk about a lot of stuff (but by no means enough stuff), including incidental racism, and mature approaches to sexual encounters in a comic aimed at younger readers. And like… Ghost fights. Because that’s what the comic has a lot of, so I couldn’t really avoid it.
I’m still pretty rusty, but I hope you enjoy the episode and come back next week for ANOTHER new episode of my niche little wonder-project.

That’s right! It’s time for a brand-spanking new episode of Friendship! Effort! Victory!. The hiatus is finally over, and I return with an episode about the very first manga I ever laid eyes upon, the supernatural cult hit Shaman King, by Hiroyuki Takei.

I talk about a lot of stuff (but by no means enough stuff), including incidental racism, and mature approaches to sexual encounters in a comic aimed at younger readers. And like… Ghost fights. Because that’s what the comic has a lot of, so I couldn’t really avoid it.

I’m still pretty rusty, but I hope you enjoy the episode and come back next week for ANOTHER new episode of my niche little wonder-project.

July62014

Anonymous said: Don't take this the wrong way, but what happened to the episode of FEV you promised. While I understand if real life is getting in the way, I was really looking forward to your next episode. Thanks for all your hard work. Sorry if I came off as a undeserving you-know-what, but I was just excited to see you about to put up something new again after the hiatus. In case you aren't told this enough, I think you are doing something great and I would like to see more of it. I apologize if I rambled.

A few last-minute real life things happened, pushing things back a week, but the Shaman King episode’s benefited from it, if that helps. Like… Well, it’s a long’un. At this point me missing deadlines I set myself is almost a given, but… Yeah, it frustrates me too.

I don’t think I ever consider anyone who expects me to deliver the things I say I’ll do as undeserving or entitled or anything. In all the years I’ve been doing creative projects on the internet any stuff like this has always been on me, building up people’s expectations and then getting tripped up by… well, being me, with my life and all that entails.

Besides, I’m pretty sure I have the most patient listeners ever, so I can only ever be grateful.

July42014
retrosofa:

thedespondent:

Hey, would you look at that, it’s the debut cover for Hisashi Eguchi's Stop!! Hibari-kun in Weekly Shonen Jump, and boy is it a beauty.
I’ve been reading through what I *think* is all three volumes (They’re the Futabasha kanzenban editions) and aside from it just kinda stopping this might be one of my new favourites. Eguchi’s a ridiculously amazing artist, and you can see that even this early into his career.
Now if only my language skills were better, the writing would probably make more sense

There’s a rumor Eguchi apparently finished the manga in a reprint a couple of years back. I have yet to see it. Also, Sprint (or some other cellphone company) was offering free translated downloads of the manga. 

The translated downloads were totally a thing, yeah, but were gone before I was aware of them, sadly. The, uh, the rumour though… It’s frustrating. It’s the kanzenban editions I’ve read that were originally supposed to have a proper conclusion to the title in it, but it just kinda stops again with a message in it talking about how Eguchi won’t finish it. A huge shame.

retrosofa:

thedespondent:

Hey, would you look at that, it’s the debut cover for Hisashi Eguchi's Stop!! Hibari-kun in Weekly Shonen Jump, and boy is it a beauty.

I’ve been reading through what I *think* is all three volumes (They’re the Futabasha kanzenban editions) and aside from it just kinda stopping this might be one of my new favourites. Eguchi’s a ridiculously amazing artist, and you can see that even this early into his career.

Now if only my language skills were better, the writing would probably make more sense

There’s a rumor Eguchi apparently finished the manga in a reprint a couple of years back. I have yet to see it. Also, Sprint (or some other cellphone company) was offering free translated downloads of the manga. 

The translated downloads were totally a thing, yeah, but were gone before I was aware of them, sadly. The, uh, the rumour though… It’s frustrating. It’s the kanzenban editions I’ve read that were originally supposed to have a proper conclusion to the title in it, but it just kinda stops again with a message in it talking about how Eguchi won’t finish it. A huge shame.

June252014

FEV update!!

You may have noticed that things have been all silent on the Friendship! Effort! Victory! front for a good few months now, despite the fact that I was apparently quite close to new episodes being finished aaaaaages ago. Long story short, I wasn’t happy with that content, or indeed much of anything back then. BUT! That feeling couldn’t last forever, and after a whole bunch of writing, soul-searching and looking at what I wanted to do going forward with FEV, balancing it against my real life and such dramatic things, I’m finally ready to continue series 2, starting on the 30th of June, with a nice, lengthy episode about the first comic I ever read, Hiroyuki Takei's Shaman King! This’ll be followed a week later with an episode about Kouhei Horikoshi's Barrage, both to herald in the author’s new comic, and to allow me to lay into something mediocre for a bit. After that, FEV will be running off the original fortnightly schedule, with new non-podcast content going up in the off weeks.

It’s all part of a build-up to me doing more projects on the internet again, and heading towards doing a patreon to help make FEV feasible as an ongoing project towards the end of the year.

Thank you, every single one of you listeners and fans who stuck with the show through not one, but TWO hiatuses, and hopefully you treat me like our own hiatus king Yoshihiro Togashi and welcome me back despite my terrible project-dodging.

(note: these episodes are actually already done, as part of a buffer to make sure that these breaks happen less, if indeed ever again, so these release dates won’t be missed this time. THAT’S NICE)

May122014

Slightly Custom 30 Days of Manga Day Seventeen
A manga that you feel embarrassed about liking -

Hmm…..

Uh…

Not really?

I mean for real, screw being embarrassed about liking comics. Sure, some people like really, REALLY problematic and terrible comics, that communicate horrific things or worrying aspects of the creator themself. But… I don’t read any that are like that. So… Screw it?

8PM
Slightly Custom 30 Days of Manga Day SixteenA manga that isn’t available in English but SHOULD be: Samurai Usagi by Teppei Fukushima
Teppei Fukushima is almost definitely the best kept secret  of Weekly Shonen Jump. I’ve said this before, both here on tumblr and to anyone who’ll listen. It seems a strange proclamation, because as it goes his one ongoing serialisation lasted over a year of weekly chapters and continues to have a devoted fan following to this day, but despite this he still comes across as ridiculously unknown, a talent up there with some of Jump’s best in recent years, and yet he hasn’t resurfaced for more than short works over the half-decade since Samurai Usagi concluded. Those short works are excellent, of course, and have shown growth on his part to a ridiculous level, art-wise, but still…. Teppei’s so unheard of.
As such, Samurai Usagi is super unlikely to come out in English. It’s not really that marketable to the small market that consumes licensed manga in the language, and more’s the pity. Samurai Usagi is something so excellent in what it is, so very unique unto itself that it really deserves to be wider read beyond what countries it’s available in (Japan and France, I believe. I should check if there’s more).
Samurai Usagi’s concept is simple in theory; it’s the story of Gosuke Udagawa, a 15 year-old samurai in the edo period whose family were shamed and had to commit suicide, leaving him with the family dojo and not much else. His life is changed forever by his budding relationship with his young wife, Shino, whose obsession with rabbits and making masks inspires him to start his own style of swordplay, “rabbit-fencing”, which is just for people who just want to… ENJOY swordplay.
This is a big thing. By being set when it is, such a lowly dojo run by a child of a shamed family, focused on being something other than the frankly iffy ways of high-ranking samurai, it’s essentially challenging the whole system just by having people do something other than be terrible people with swords. The whole comic has a lot to do with this, criticising the samurai code, or Bushido, that was present at the time, the flawed system that allowed high-ranking samurai to treat others as pure dirt, exploiting them through their power and ownership and mastery of sharp bits of metal.
Over the course of the story they end up in conflict with all sorts of people, make all sorts of friends, and the Rabbit Dojo grows, getting a fantastic rounded cast of swordsmen who all get just enough focus to be more than just side characters. But as great as they all are, the real shining point is the relationship between Gosuke and Shino.
It’s rare in a teen boys’ comic for the main character to be married before the story even begins, and that’s understandable for a variety of reasons, the most obvious of which being that it limits any “will they/won’t they” that the comic can pull off. But what’s great here is that by having them bound for life, but new to their feelings, and being young teens, an you get to see them learn about each other, figure out each other’s traits, grow to love each other and to support each other in everything they do. It’s one of the greatest relationships in comics, and it’s there from chapter one.
Heck, when it came time to do an epilogue for the title, they focused on the result of their love, telling a tale of their daughter. It’s perfect.
The character designs, and more so the art in general, is absolutely brilliant. It’s so unlike anything that really appears in Jump, showcasing Teppei’s range in everything from the quiet, peaceful moments with the cast to the tense sword-action that comes with any given conflict. I really can’t give this art enough praise. There’s so many moments in the title where I’ve just had to stop reading and stare. Not even big moments. Just a panel that strikes me as particularly pretty can have the power to stop me in my tracks. Teppei’s just that good.
So yeah, Samurai Usagi. It’s criminal that this’ll never make it into english bookstores, because I want you all to understand my ridiculous love of this title and the creator.

Slightly Custom 30 Days of Manga Day Sixteen
A manga that isn’t available in English but SHOULD be: Samurai Usagi by Teppei Fukushima

  • Teppei Fukushima is almost definitely the best kept secret  of Weekly Shonen Jump. I’ve said this before, both here on tumblr and to anyone who’ll listen. It seems a strange proclamation, because as it goes his one ongoing serialisation lasted over a year of weekly chapters and continues to have a devoted fan following to this day, but despite this he still comes across as ridiculously unknown, a talent up there with some of Jump’s best in recent years, and yet he hasn’t resurfaced for more than short works over the half-decade since Samurai Usagi concluded. Those short works are excellent, of course, and have shown growth on his part to a ridiculous level, art-wise, but still…. Teppei’s so unheard of.
  • As such, Samurai Usagi is super unlikely to come out in English. It’s not really that marketable to the small market that consumes licensed manga in the language, and more’s the pity. Samurai Usagi is something so excellent in what it is, so very unique unto itself that it really deserves to be wider read beyond what countries it’s available in (Japan and France, I believe. I should check if there’s more).
  • Samurai Usagi’s concept is simple in theory; it’s the story of Gosuke Udagawa, a 15 year-old samurai in the edo period whose family were shamed and had to commit suicide, leaving him with the family dojo and not much else. His life is changed forever by his budding relationship with his young wife, Shino, whose obsession with rabbits and making masks inspires him to start his own style of swordplay, “rabbit-fencing”, which is just for people who just want to… ENJOY swordplay.
  • This is a big thing. By being set when it is, such a lowly dojo run by a child of a shamed family, focused on being something other than the frankly iffy ways of high-ranking samurai, it’s essentially challenging the whole system just by having people do something other than be terrible people with swords. The whole comic has a lot to do with this, criticising the samurai code, or Bushido, that was present at the time, the flawed system that allowed high-ranking samurai to treat others as pure dirt, exploiting them through their power and ownership and mastery of sharp bits of metal.
  • Over the course of the story they end up in conflict with all sorts of people, make all sorts of friends, and the Rabbit Dojo grows, getting a fantastic rounded cast of swordsmen who all get just enough focus to be more than just side characters. But as great as they all are, the real shining point is the relationship between Gosuke and Shino.
  • It’s rare in a teen boys’ comic for the main character to be married before the story even begins, and that’s understandable for a variety of reasons, the most obvious of which being that it limits any “will they/won’t they” that the comic can pull off. But what’s great here is that by having them bound for life, but new to their feelings, and being young teens, an you get to see them learn about each other, figure out each other’s traits, grow to love each other and to support each other in everything they do. It’s one of the greatest relationships in comics, and it’s there from chapter one.
  • Heck, when it came time to do an epilogue for the title, they focused on the result of their love, telling a tale of their daughter. It’s perfect.
  • The character designs, and more so the art in general, is absolutely brilliant. It’s so unlike anything that really appears in Jump, showcasing Teppei’s range in everything from the quiet, peaceful moments with the cast to the tense sword-action that comes with any given conflict. I really can’t give this art enough praise. There’s so many moments in the title where I’ve just had to stop reading and stare. Not even big moments. Just a panel that strikes me as particularly pretty can have the power to stop me in my tracks. Teppei’s just that good.
  • So yeah, Samurai Usagi. It’s criminal that this’ll never make it into english bookstores, because I want you all to understand my ridiculous love of this title and the creator.
7PM
Slightly Custom 30 Days of Manga Day FifteenThe most emotional scene: “Don’t Cry” from Slam Dunk (Takehiko Inoue)
Allow me to paint a picture of a series of pictures using words that can’t possibly convey the scene in as powerful a way as the actual pictures themselves. Also, SPOILERS for the greatest comic of all time. I mean yeah it’s from decades ago but still.
Sakuragi is a red-haired punk with little interest in anything other than girls and being super tough, who ends up joining his school’s basketball club to try and impress a girl. After a few rude awakenings to his failings, and despite his self-inflated ego and proclamations of being a genius, he’s found his specialty in the team with his rebound work, and through hard work and perseverance he and his team, Shohoku, are up against one of the best teams in the area, Kainan, who were one of the early lessons in humility for everyone’s favourite ‘genius’. We get to see his and the team’s growth as they face challenge after challenge and see the game right up to the end with staggeringly close points between the two rival teams. It looks like this could be one of the most cathartic wins for the team, and a stunning moment in the entire series.
Of course it ends up only being the latter.
Fellow team member and 3-point expert Mitsui goes for the final shoot, only to have it thrown off by the tip of the finger of an opposing player. It rebounds, Sakuragi goes in for the rebound, getting the ball in a spectacular moment, and passes it.
……. He accidentally passes it to the other team. Right into their hands. They shoot, score, Shohoku loses. They lose the best chance to get into the next stage of the basketball tournament.
THIS IS SHOCKING. teen-oriented “boys” comics almost train you to believe the protagonist will pull it together at the last second, and here we have one of the most popular pulling the rug under your feet, taking the moment away from you. It’s not the only title ever to have done this, but Jesus it pulled this off better than anything else past, present or future.
The moment happens, and your breath just… Stops. You get a few pages of everyone realising what’s happened, of the match ending, and then the team captain Akagi goes over to Sakuragi. You don’t know how he’ll react. This could have been the biggest moment for the team, something incomparable to anything that had come before, and Sakuragi had let them down at a critical moment. He could be ballistically mad, he could be painfully depressed, who knows. WHO KNOWS? But what we get instead is the most memorable panel for me in the whole comic. We get Akagi putting his hand on Sakuragi’s head, and sincerely showing him the compassion he needs at that moment in time, supporting his underclassman and comforting at what must be the most humiliating moment in the young player’s life. And he does it all just by saying two words to him. “don’t cry”. (I mean there’s a little bit before of him giving a proper bit of speech to him, but that hardly matters compared to this one moment).
I talk about how when comics get an emotional reaction out of me I “break”, and that’s not really something that should get thrown around so lightly. So for this moment I have to say it differently. This scene made me feel so much that I just straight up stopped reading at the end of the chapter, and had a little manly cry. Nothing compares to this.
But then nothing compares to Slam Dunk. I could talk about it till the cows come home. Best manga, best comic, best fiction, best creation, whatever. Let’s go hyperbolic all the way here, because Slam Dunk is just straight up the best thing. Read it.

Slightly Custom 30 Days of Manga Day Fifteen
The most emotional scene: “Don’t Cry” from Slam Dunk (Takehiko Inoue)

  • Allow me to paint a picture of a series of pictures using words that can’t possibly convey the scene in as powerful a way as the actual pictures themselves. Also, SPOILERS for the greatest comic of all time. I mean yeah it’s from decades ago but still.
  • Sakuragi is a red-haired punk with little interest in anything other than girls and being super tough, who ends up joining his school’s basketball club to try and impress a girl. After a few rude awakenings to his failings, and despite his self-inflated ego and proclamations of being a genius, he’s found his specialty in the team with his rebound work, and through hard work and perseverance he and his team, Shohoku, are up against one of the best teams in the area, Kainan, who were one of the early lessons in humility for everyone’s favourite ‘genius’. We get to see his and the team’s growth as they face challenge after challenge and see the game right up to the end with staggeringly close points between the two rival teams. It looks like this could be one of the most cathartic wins for the team, and a stunning moment in the entire series.
  • Of course it ends up only being the latter.
  • Fellow team member and 3-point expert Mitsui goes for the final shoot, only to have it thrown off by the tip of the finger of an opposing player. It rebounds, Sakuragi goes in for the rebound, getting the ball in a spectacular moment, and passes it.
  • ……. He accidentally passes it to the other team. Right into their hands. They shoot, score, Shohoku loses. They lose the best chance to get into the next stage of the basketball tournament.
  • THIS IS SHOCKING. teen-oriented “boys” comics almost train you to believe the protagonist will pull it together at the last second, and here we have one of the most popular pulling the rug under your feet, taking the moment away from you. It’s not the only title ever to have done this, but Jesus it pulled this off better than anything else past, present or future.
  • The moment happens, and your breath just… Stops. You get a few pages of everyone realising what’s happened, of the match ending, and then the team captain Akagi goes over to Sakuragi. You don’t know how he’ll react. This could have been the biggest moment for the team, something incomparable to anything that had come before, and Sakuragi had let them down at a critical moment. He could be ballistically mad, he could be painfully depressed, who knows. WHO KNOWS? But what we get instead is the most memorable panel for me in the whole comic. We get Akagi putting his hand on Sakuragi’s head, and sincerely showing him the compassion he needs at that moment in time, supporting his underclassman and comforting at what must be the most humiliating moment in the young player’s life. And he does it all just by saying two words to him. “don’t cry”. (I mean there’s a little bit before of him giving a proper bit of speech to him, but that hardly matters compared to this one moment).
  • I talk about how when comics get an emotional reaction out of me I “break”, and that’s not really something that should get thrown around so lightly. So for this moment I have to say it differently. This scene made me feel so much that I just straight up stopped reading at the end of the chapter, and had a little manly cry. Nothing compares to this.
  • But then nothing compares to Slam Dunk. I could talk about it till the cows come home. Best manga, best comic, best fiction, best creation, whatever. Let’s go hyperbolic all the way here, because Slam Dunk is just straight up the best thing. Read it.
← Older entries Page 1 of 39